Press Releases

Hydro-Quebec megadams and Central Maine Power corridor subject of Maine events 

Featured Indigenous and allied land and water protectors spoke to the environmental damage of the project

Augusta, ME–Yesterday, Indigenous community members and allies delivered a letter to Governor Mills asking her to withdraw support for the controversial Central Maine Transmission (CMP) corridor that will import Canadian hydropower to Massachusetts. The letter debunks the myth that large-scale hydro is a renewable resource and that instead, it destroys our rivers and ecosystems. 

CMP will cut through vast swathes of pristine wildlife habitat in Maine to bring electricity from Canada to customers in Massachusetts while having tremendous negative impacts on rivers and their communities in Canada and the United States. 

The letter was delivered as part of North American Megadams Resistance Alliance’s (NAMRA) Northeast speaker tour raising awareness of the negative impacts of Hydro-Quebec’s operations in Canada. The Tour held speaking events in the Portland area, Augusta, Farmington and featured speakers from Pimicikamak and Inuit communities and the Grand Riverkeeper Labrador, Inc. whose lands and waters are being devastated by Canadian hydropower exported to the U.S. The tour ends at Plymouth, MA on Thanksgiving where members of Pimicikamak and Inuit communities will speak in honor of the 50th National Day of Mourning and followed by a visit with the Herring Pond Wampanoag Tribe in Plymouth, MA.

A youth activist and spokespeople for the National American Megadams Resistance Alliance and the Sierra Club had the following to say: 

“Hydropower development has altered 50,000 square miles of land that my people used for millennia to hunt, fish and trap and gather.  We can longer practice our traditional ways like our ancestors before us,” Carlton Richards of Pimicikamak territory, an Indigenous youth activist said. “This is cultural genocide. We travelled 2,200 miles from our home to tell the truth about what happens in the shadow of the dams.” 

“CMP cannot deliver on its promise to help the climate. Canadian hydropower takes more acres per megawatt than any other form of energy to produce,” Meg Sheehan, North American Megadam Resistance Alliance coordinator said. “Over the last 100 years, the industry has been responsible for massive industrial scale destruction of rivers and communities in Canada. Consumers in the U.S. who import and use this power are complicit in this destruction. Hydro-Quebec’s dams would never be allowed in the U.S., yet Maine and Massachusetts are supporting new megadams in Canada, falsely calling the power clean and green.” 

“Maine people don’t want this transmission corridor, given the environmental havoc the line will create in Maine’s Western mountains, and the permanent damage to our shared land and water resources, compounded by the unjust impact on Indigenous and front line communities,” Alice Elliot, Director at the Sierra Club Maine Chapter said. “Not only do megadams destroy rivers, forests and their communities, they undermine the development of green, clean jobs using renewable resources here in Maine.” 

November 19, 2019 

New York City Hosts Panel Discussion Amidst Mayor’s Support for More Canadian Hydro Power Hudson Riverkeeper Withdraw Support for Champlain Hudson Power Express hydro corridor:

NEW YORK CITY–Today, the Sierra Club with the North American Megadam Resistance Alliance, UPROSE and Indigenous community members hosted a panel discussing the negative impacts of large hydropower dams. The forum brought stories from the frontlines of Canadian megadam resistance to New York at a time when the state is considering Hydro-Quebec as part of the OneNYC plan to address climate change.

The Canadian hydropower industry is marketing its power in the U.S. as renewable, clean and green without acknowledging the negative environmental, social and economic impacts being felt in Canada. The ten-day tour is travelling across the Northeast from Nov. 19 – 29, stopping in key battlegrounds in the fight against dirty, destructive Canadian hydro and transmission corridors. 

On Monday, Hudson Riverkeeper withdrew its support for the $3 billion Champlain Hudson Power Express (CHPE) which would be needed for the importation of hydropower New York seeks to purchase from Hydro-Quebec. CHPE was first proposed in 2010 and languished until May 2019 when Hydro-Quebec convinced New York Mayor Bill DeBlasio to include imported hydropower as part of the City’s OneNYC green energy plan. The City has announced it will seek advice on obtaining municipal funding for CHPE, a highly unusual step.

Spokespeople for the National American Megadams Resistance Alliance, the Sierra Club and the Grand Riverkeeper Labrador had the following to say: 

“Canadian hydropower developments have left an unacceptable trail of  human, environmental and economic devastation across Canada. New York has been importing this destructive form of energy since the 1900s. Importing more is a step backward and perpetuates the cultural genocide of Indigenous people whose lands, waters and ways of life have been destroyed–and U.S. consumers of this power are complicit in this devastation, if they continue to support this power.  Meg Sheehan, North American Megadam Resistance Alliance coordinator said. “Hudson Riverkeeper’ realizes this and the withdrawal of support is a win-win for the local, renewable energy economy in New York and the Indigenous people of Canada, the environment, and the climate. Riverkeepers’ decision shows that false solutions like Canadian hydropower that is being greenwashed has no place in a clean energy plan.”  

“While the climate crisis demands a swift decarbonization of New York City’s electricity, we’re confident that there are better solutions for our city than a power-purchase agreement with Canadian megadam company HydroQuebec,” said Shay O’Reilly, Senior Organizing Representative for the Sierra Club. “We can instead invest in local renewable energy, with our public money going towards a solution that will provide good economic and social benefits for the people of New York City.” 

“The announcement from the Riverkeeper’s is step forward for all rivers globally and especially for rivers the Waterkeeper Alliance seeks to protect.” Roberta Benefiel, Grand Riverkeeper Labrador, Inc. stated, “US consumers are responsible for some of this destruction. We must stop the stop the exports via CHPE and the Central Maine Power corridors. Enough is enough.” 

April 25, 2019 updated 

Mayor DE Blasio’s call for Canadian hydropower undermines renewable energy economies and perpetuates cultural genocide of Indigenous peoples

The North American Megadams Resistance Alliance (NAMRA), an international alliance of environmental and social justice groups says Mayor de Blasio’s call for Canadian hydropower in New York City’s energy plan will undermine jobs and the local energy economy and perpetuate cultural genocide in Canada.

The City’s plan requires construction of the 330-mile Champlain Hudson Power Express (CHPE) transmission corridor under the scenic Hudson River to bring hydropower from Canada over 1,000 miles to New York. New Yorkers will be exporting their energy dollars to Canada rather than investing in the local energy economy. CHPE would provide only a few hundred temporary jobs during construction and a couple dozen permanent jobs if ever completed.  Energy conservation, energy efficiency, solar and wind provide far more jobs per million dollars invested.

NAMRA says this is dirty energy and should be treated like fossil fuels. “Decades of study show Hydro-Quebec’s megadams are a climate, environmental and social justice disaster,” said Meg Sheehan, attorney for NAMRA. “They destroy rivers and boreal forests, eliminating their potential to sequester carbon and release greenhouse gases during construction and operation. Hydro-Quebec’s dams may emit carbon dioxide at rates close to 32 to 63% of a natural gas plant. There is no valid data to show CHPE will reduce NYC’s carbon emissions. CHPE will cost $2.2 billion – money that should be spent locally on renewables instead this dirty energy transmission line.”

Megadams are strewn across Canada. Decades of construction and operation has caused massive damage to free flowing rivers and communities. Dam construction continues. A 2016 Harvard study shows the dams cause toxic methylmercury to enter the environment poisoning local foods and people. Nearly one third of Hydro-Quebec’s dams were built on the ancestral territory of the Pessamit Innu, a First Nation’s people on the North Shore of the Saint Lawrence River. In Newfoundland-Labrador Province, Nalcor’s dams on the Grand (Churchill) River have flooded lands of the Inuit and Innu Nations. Inuit grandmother Marjorie Flowers has toured the Northeast to bring attention to methylmercury poisoning and the harmful impacts of Nalcor’s Muskrat Falls dam. Dam opponents have been arrested and jailed. An official inquiry on Muskrat Falls is investigating project mismanagement and the role of SNC Lavalin. www.muskratfallsinquiry.ca

“This is a greenwash. Hydro-Quebec should not be part of a “green new deal” in New York City or anywhere else,” added Sheehan.  “This is a climate disaster and wrongful violation of human rights,” added Sheehan.

More information: www.internationalrivers.org/problems-with-big-dams www.northeastmegadamsresistance.org

March 14, 2019 – Dam Opponents Celebrate International Day of Action for Rivers

The North American Megadams Resistance Alliance (NAMRA) stands in solidarity with groups opposing megadams on International Rivers’ Day of Action on March 14, 2019.  NAMRA is an international coalition of environmental and social justice groups opposing the ongoing destruction of rivers and communities by megadams.

The Day of Action highlights women’s role in protecting and managing rivers. NAMRA has organized speaking tours for women leaders from Labrador, Canada opposing the Muskrat Falls megadam. Marjorie Flowers, an Innu grandmother arrested and jailed for opposing the dam, Inuk Amy Norman, and Grand Riverkeeper Labrador, Roberta Benefiel toured recently to raise awareness about methyl mercury poisoning caused by Muskrat Falls and the destruction of forests, the river, and indigenous ways of life. According to Benefiel, concerns with Muskrat Falls include “possible dam failure because the North Spur (a natural dam) is made up of made up of layers quick clay prone to liquefy under pressure or from further saturation.”

NAMRA’s solidarity extends to Indonesia in Southeast Asia where new megadams threaten Indigenous communities and the environment. The Tampur megadam threatens Indonesia’s globally significant Leuser Ecosystem, home to iconic rainforest species such as the Sumatran elephant and tigers. “The Tampur hydrodam is a catastrophic project that threatens communities and biodiversity and would destroy 4,000 hectares of critical forests inside the Leuser Ecosystem, as well as the river which communities depend on for their daily lives,” said Irham Hudaya Yunardi, of Forest, Nature, Environment of Aceh (HAkA) in Indonesia.

NAMRA’s supports communities opposing the transmission corridors that will bring megadam power to distant markets. In Maine, the controversial Iberdrola-Central Maine Power corridor will cut a 145-mile swarth through wilderness to bring electricity from remote areas of Canada to Massachusetts. Promoters claim it is clean energy. “Decades of studies show that megadams are climate busters, not climate saviors,” said Meg Sheehan, an attorney and coordinator for NAMRA. In addition to damaging rivers and communities, this is dirty energy and should be treated like fossil fuels,” Sheehan added.

February 22, 2019 – International network supports activists testifying at government inquiry on Muskrat Falls megadam

Inuit Marjorie Flowers and Grand Riverkeeper Roberta Benefiel oppose Muskrat Falls at Inquiry on Feb. 22, 2019

North American Megadams Resistance Alliance (NAMRA) announced its support for Grand Riverkeeper’s Roberta Benefiel and Labrador Land Protector Marjorie Flowers who will testify against the controversial $12.9 billion Muskrat Falls megadam at Phase II of the Commission of Inquiry Respecting the Muskrat Falls Project (Inquiry) established by the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador. The Inquiry is investigating project mismanagement and cost overruns by Nalcor, the Crown corporation building the megadam. Muskrat Falls Concerned Citizens Coalition, Benefiel, Flowers and others demanded the Inquiry, collecting over 1,000 petition signatures.

According to Benefiel, information “revealed beyond a shadow of a doubt that costs, studies, reports, and experts were manipulated by Nalcor to gain government approval. The decision-making process was horribly flawed and excluded meaningful consideration of the megadam’s devastating impacts on rivers and communities. The financial projections were also wrong. The inquiry is exposing just how corrupt and single-minded our previous and current governments have been in their head-long rush to build Muskrat Falls. Tragically, Newfoundlanders and Labradorians will bear the financial, ecological, and societal costs forever. Our electric rates are projected to rise to about 21 cents per kilowatt hour in order to cover Nalcor’s cost overruns,” Benefiel said.

Flowers, an Inuit grandmother jailed multiple times for protesting the Muskrat Falls dam, will testify about the irreparable harm to her way of life and community from the dam. She states, “We are tired of the provincial government coming here to Labrador and using our lands for resource extraction with a brazen disregard for both Indigenous and non-Indigenous people, our cultures and the environment. My people have lived here for generations, relying on food from the river that is now going to be poisoned with methylmercury. The government and industry reap the benefits and leave giant footprints and toxic garbage, destroy forests, dam our rivers, poison our water and take more and more — leaving us to bear the cost. When I have dared to speak up, I have been jailed.”

NAMRA opposes the Muskrat Falls and Hydro-Quebec megadams and the many long-distance power lines proposed to bring Canadian hydropower to the United States. NAMRA spokesperson Meg Sheehan says “Multi-national corporations falsely claim this is ‘renewable’ clean energy. Destroying rivers and communities in Canada for ‘clean’ energy in the U.S. is unacceptable.”

Flowers and Benefiel will testify 2/22/19 at 9:30 a.m at the Lawrence O’Brien Arts Center, Happy Valley-Goose Bay Labrador, Canada

Inquiry Webcast: www.muskratfallsinquiry.ca/

November, 2018 – National Day of Mourning, Plymouth MA

Marjorie Flowers, an Inuit woman from Nunatsiavut, Labrador, will speak on the effects of the Muskrat Falls hydro project, at the United American Indians of New England’s Day of Mourning, on Cole Hill, in Plymouth, Massachusetts, at noon on November 22, 2018.

A member of the Labrador Land Protectors, Flowers was born and raised in Rigolet, Labrador, near the site of the Muskrat Falls megadam under construction on the Grand (Churchill) River.

Since 2011, Indigenous people and settlers living in the HappyValley/ GooseBay region of Labrador – which is unceded Innu and Inuit land – have been excluded from a process that has allowed the Muskrat Falls megadam to proceed, regardless of their grave concerns about methylmercury poisoning of their traditional food web and the daily threat of dam collapse.

The Labrador Land Protectors state: “Our fears are real; some of us go to sleep at night with life preservers under our beds. We live the despair of knowing our way of life that has existed for generations is being threatened. Justin Trudeau recently apologized for a past act of Labrador cultural genocide, yet his government supports this impending act of cultural genocide with a $9.2 billion federal investment.”

Much of the resistance to the Muskrat Falls dam has taken place with very little media attention here in the United States. Dozens of land protectors and riverkeepers in Labrador have been criminalized (and some, including Elders, jailed in maximum security penitentiaries) for peaceful acts of resistance and sacred ceremonies on traditional lands.

“All calls for accountability, transparency, and respect have been ignored as this megaproject proceeds full speed ahead, doubling in a cost (now $12.7 billion) that will be borne by our province’s poorest residents and next generations” the Land Protectors state.

“All possible political channels have been exhausted, from meetings with bureaucrats and Ministers to years of lobbying, petitioning, demonstrating, and civil disobedience in Labrador. Still the federal and provincial governments refuse to seek and obtain the free, prior and informed consent of all of us affected downstream.”

Since 1970, Indigenous people have gathered at noon on Cole’s Hill in Plymouth to commemorate a National Day of Mourning on the US thanksgiving holiday. Many Native people do not celebrate the arrival of the Pilgrims and other European settlers. Thanksgiving Day is a reminder of the genocide of millions of Native people, the theft of Native lands, and the relentless assault on Native culture. Participants in National Day of Mourning honor Indigenous ancestors and the struggles of Native peoples to survive today. It is a day of remembrance and spiritual connection as well as a protest of the racism and oppression that Native people continue to experience.

Marjorie Flowers’ speaking tour is sponsored by the North American Megadams Resistance Alliance (NAMRA), which opposes imports of hydroelectricity from large dams – like Muskrat Falls – that have caused irreversible harm to ecosystems and to Indigenous communities. The States of Vermont, Massachussetts, Maine, New Hampshire, and New York, are connected to the expansion of hydroelectric development on Indigenous lands through imports of electricity from Hydro Quebec, according to NAMRA.   (Electricity from Hydro Quebec includes energy generated in Labrador on the Churchill River.)

August 12-13, 2018 – Alliance Calls for Rejection of Hydropower Imports from Canada at the 42nd Annual Conference of New England Governors  Eastern Canadian Premiers Conference in Stowe, Vermont

On August 1213, 2018, during the Conference of New England Governors and Eastern Canadian Premiers, in Stowe, Vermont, the North American Megadams Resistance Alliance (NAMRA), an international network of environmental and social justice groups, will participate in events to address the cross border issues of transmission corridors and electricity produced by megadams in Canada.

The NAMRA mission is to block transmission corridors and contracts to import hydroelectric power produced by mega dams in Canada, such as Muskrat Falls, which are causing irreversible harm to ecosystems and to communities. These mega dam systems are no longer permitted to be built in the United States.

Northeast states can meet all decarbonization and greenhouse gas reduction targets by expanding renewable energy, efficiency and conservation initiatives, while promoting local economies and creating jobs, NAMRA states.

NAMRA is opposed to the construction of new long-distance transmission corridors for the export of hydropower from Quebec and Labrador into the United States. Proposed corridors include the Atlantic Link, New England Clean Energy Connect, Champlain Hudson Power Express, New England Clean Power Link, Vermont Green Line, and the Northern Pass.

NAMRA supports the efforts of the Labrador Land Protectors and Grand Riverkeeper, Labrador, to halt the construction of the $13 billion Muskrat Falls hydroelectric complex. For decades, First Nations, Metis and settlers, living in the Happy Valley/ Goose Bay region of Labrador, have been ignored in a process that has allowed the Muskrat Falls construction to proceed, despite the certainty of methylmercury poisoning the food chain, the destruction of a way of life, and the daily threat of a dam collapse due to quick clay liquefaction.

“It is time to stop destroying rivers everywhere,” said Tom Ellis of the Solidarity Committee of the Capital District, in Albany, New York. “The Solidarity Committee opposed the Great Whale hydroelectric project 25 years ago and we have opposed the Champlain Hudson Power Express transmission corridor since it was proposed in 2010.”

The Sierra Club Maine Chapter, a member of NAMRA, is opposing the Maine Central Power’s proposed New England Clean Power Link transmission corridor, which would require clearing a large, currently undisturbed swath of Maine’s North Woods. While failing to reduce climate changing pollution, threatening wildlife, and disturbing pristine forests, the project would jeopardize existing and future renewable energy development in the region.

“We should be using electricity that is carbon-emission free and fully renewable, and these mega dam projects are neither,” says NAMRA member Steve Crowley, Energy Chair of the Vermont Sierra Club. “Beyond this, when you consider poisoning the fish, and the people who consume them, with methyl mercury, and disrupting the lives of Indigenous communities, there’s no way this is the right thing to do. By using this mega dam power, we are directly responsible for impacts that would be completely intolerable if they were here in our backyard. We don’t need to import electricity produced by destructive mega dams 1,000 or more miles away. ”

“We ask the citizens of northeastern states to pay attention to the struggle underway in Labrador over Muskrat Falls. Hydro-electricity from large dams is neither clean nor green. Our energy policies must be based on respect for social justice and human rights. Large dams destroy forests and wetlands, contributing significantly to climate change and biodiversity loss,” stated Rachel Smolker, a Vermont member of the Alliance.

“Making it Real: A Forum on Energy and Climate” will be on Sunday August 12, at 5-7 pm, at the Waterbury United Church of Christ, 8 North Main Street (at the top of Bank Hill), in Waterbury, Vermont.

August 13, 2018 – “Rally for Real Climate Solutions: No Pipelines. Nukes, or Megadams” will take place on Monday August 13, at 2:30 pm, in front of the Stowe Mountain Lodge, 7412 Mountain Road, Stowe, Vermont. The press conference will begin at 5 pm, at the same location.

May 7, 2018 –  Northeast MegaDam Resistance  Supports Nonviolent Land Protectors against the Muskrat Falls Megaproject

The Northeast MegaDam Resistance Coalition, in solidarity with the communities living downstream of the Muskrat Falls mega project under construction in Labrador, supports the nonviolent Land Protectors participating today in a national day of nonviolent direct action, organized by the Ontario-Muskrat Solidarity Coalition on Parliament Hill in Ottawa – which is unceded Algonquin territory.

 Since 2011, Indigenous people and settlers living in the Happy Valley/ Goose Bay region of Labrador, which is unceded Innu and Inuit land, have been excluded from a process that has allowed the Muskrat Falls mega dam construction to proceed, despite their grave concerns about methylmercury poisoning of their traditional food web and the daily threat of dam collapse.

Labrador Land Protectors state: “Our fears are real; some of us go to sleep at night with life preservers under our beds. We live the despair of knowing our way of life that has existed for generations is being threatened. Justin Trudeau recently apologized for a past act of Labrador cultural genocide, yet his government supports this impending act of cultural genocide with a $9.2 billion federal investment.”

 Much of the fight against the Muskrat Falls dam has taken place with very little media attention here in the United States. Members of the Labrador Land Protectors, https://www.facebook.com/labradorlandprotectors/ and, the Grand Riverkeeper Labrador http://www.grandriverkeeperlabrador.ca/ , along with supporters and residents in Labrador have been criminalized (and some, including Elders, jailed in maximum security penitentiaries) for peaceful acts of resistance and sacred ceremonies on traditional lands. 

“All calls for accountability, transparency, and respect have been ignored as this megaproject proceeds full speed ahead, doubling in a cost (now $12.7 billion) that will be borne by our province’s poorest residents and next generations. All possible political channels have been exhausted, from meetings with bureaucrats and Ministers to years of lobbying, petitioning, demonstrating, and civil disobedience in Labrador. Still the federal and provincial governments refuse to seek and obtain the free, prior and informed consent of all of us affected downstream,” said the Labrador Land Protectors

 The mission of the Northeast Megadams Resistance Coalition is to block imports of hydroelectricity produced by mega dams, such as Muskrat Falls, which are causing irreversible harm to ecosystems and to Indigenous communities. We recognize our responsibility as citizens of the States of Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont, and New York, which, have been complicit in promoting the expansion of mega dams on Indigenous lands, by negotiating for contracts to import electricity from Hydro Quebec and Nalcor Energy in Labrador.

 The proposed new transmission corridors– Central Maine Power’s New England Clean Energy Connect, the Northern Pass into New Hampshire, the New England Clean Power Link into Vermont, and the Champlain Hudson Power Express into New York– if built, would deliver hydroelectricity from Quebec and Labrador to the region. This will certainly incentivize new mega dam construction on Indigenous lands.

 “We ask the citizens of northeastern states to pay attention to the struggle underway in Labrador over Muskrat Falls. Hydroelectricity from large dams is neither clean nor green. Our energy policies must be based on respect for social justice and human rights. Large dams destroy forests and wetlands, contributing significantly to climate change and biodiversity loss,” stated Alexis Lathem, a Vermont member of the Coalition.

 “We should be using electricity that is carbon-emission free and fully renewable, and these mega dam projects are neither,” says Coalition member Steve Crowley, Energy Chair of the Vermont Sierra Club.  “The only way to consider these projects renewable is to completely ignore the elimination of that vast forest resource that is not growing back on any schedule.  Beyond this, when you consider poisoning the fish, and the people who consume them, with methyl mercury, and disrupting the lives of Indigenous communities, there’s no way this is the right thing to do.  By using this mega dam power, we are directly responsible for impacts that would be completely intolerable if they were here in our backyard.”

 The northeast States must expand and promote local renewable energy and energy efficiency programs to achieve long-term energy sustainability. We don’t need to import electricity produced by destructive mega dams 1,000 or more miles away.