NAMRA is a broad-based ad hoc alliance of groups and individuals who care about rivers, communities and climate. We are pluralistic, a clearinghouse for information, and a forum for voices from various communities on the issue of megadams and energy policy impacts on rivers and human rights. 

We are not funded by or allied with any for-profit venture, including any that might compete with megadams in the energy marketplace. We are volunteer-led, with a volunteer coordinator. In 2019 we hired a paid staffer.  We are not a 501(c)(3), but operate with a fiscal sponsor, the Global Justice Ecology Project, an arrangement fully in compliance with IRS and non-profit governance standards and best practices.

Our funding comes from private donations, our supporter groups, and we seek funding from foundations.  Our list of supporters ranges from the national Sierra Club to the New Community Project, “a small non-profit organization with a big goal: to change the world.”  We are part of the Wa Ni Ska Tan alliance of hydro-impacted communities at the University of Manitoba.

We have no financial stake in the game of defeating megadams and their transmission corridors.  We stand up for the rights of people and the rights of nature, not for corporations or profiteers. We get out the message that megadam hydro is a false solution to the climate crisis and a climate and humanitarian disaster.

NAMRA came together as an alliance of individuals and groups in 2017, in response to the proposal by Emera, a Canadian based multi-billion dollar energy company, to bring so-called “clean” megadam hydropower from remote regions of Canada to Plymouth, Massachusetts. At the time, one of NAMRA’s founders, a long time river advocate working on dam removals with the Jones River Watershed Association was fighting to close Entergy Corporation’s Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station in Plymouth. The plan was for Massachusetts to approve a contract to bring hydro from Canada via a subsea cable from Nova Scotia, Canada through the Gulf of Maine, to land in Cape Cod Bay in Plymouth. This was Governor Baker’s plan to replace the dirty nuke – with more dirty energy – this time from Canadian megadams.

Local activists soon mobilized against Emera’s plan to import Canadian hydro to Plymouth, Massachusetts and the project was not chosen by Massachusetts energy regulators. In the meantime, NAMRA invited front-line community members to Plymouth to speak at the Day of Mourning in Plymouth in November, 2017, launching what is now an annual speaking tour. The Grand Riverkeeper, Labrador and the Labrador Land Protectors helped allies in the U.S. educate people and politicians about the unacceptable environmental and human impacts of megadam hydropower from Canada.  

The NAMRA movement grew as we expanded our reach to allies in the U.S and Canada fighting other schemes to build more megadams and to export dirty Canadian hydropower to the U.S.  from the falsely-labelled New England Clean Energy Connect to the Site C fiasco in British Columbia. We continue to debunk the myth of “clean, green and renewable” megadams and work with as many allies as possible. 

To join our alliance or find out more, contact us at coordinator.namra@gmail.com